Sheridan Valley – Lewiston

On Fri., Mar. 14, 1941, the “Michigan Mirror” column of The Cass City Chronicle said:

Lewiston's toboggan slide, the
"baby" of 1941, is growing up fast.

Apparently the toboggan slide was new either that year or in 1940. They don’t mention skiing and I do not know if this slide was located where Sheridan Valley came to be located.

Sheridan Valley was 7 mi northeast of Lewiston on Co 612. It had 7 slopes from 600′ to 1800′ long, 4 rope tows, rentals, instruction and hot lunches. This information from a Consumers Power brochure circa 1959. On Jan. 4, 1968, The Cass City Chronicle printed the AAA Guide to Winter Sports Fun in Michigan listing Sheridan Valley with 8 slopes, Pomalift and 3 tows.

Sheridan Valley Patch

Sheridan Valley Patch

7 Responses to Sheridan Valley – Lewiston

  1. Cat Houchins says:

    The tobaggon slide was on the south side of East Twin Lake not far from where the Lewiston Lodge is located. There was also a fire tower on the same hill. I never saw the tobaggon slide, but I did get to climb up the fire tower before it was torn down. My dad owned and operated a private airport next to the Lewiston Elementary School from 1960 until he sold it in the 1990s. He built a hanger next to the cemetery and stored his airplane in there. We also have a cabin on the north side of East Twin Lake.

  2. Cat Houchins says:

    I learned to snow ski at Sheridan Valley Ski Club in Lewiston, Michigan. Our family 4 children ranging in ages from 2 to 10 were part of the charter members of this club. My dad, who was an electrical engineer by trade, often spent time working on the ropes and poma lift. We have a cabin on East Twin Lake and came up as often as we could to ski. We lived just north of Detroit and it was bitterly cold coming into a unheated cabin on Friday nights. When I was a teenager we quit going. So probably the years we were there were 1961 to 1970.
    The one big hill there was called “Norway”. I attempted it a few times, but not with much hesitation. My hotdog brother skied it like a pro. The clubhouse had a wonderful round fireplace where we warmed up after hours out. I loved the chili that Lyn and Chloe Cauchon made from scratch in the kitchen. Lyn and Chloe stayed close with my family through the years until they passed away. I remember the Mays, Hustons, Mayers from Clarkston, Mich. and I had a crush on a John Barney when I was a very young teen. The club has closed and it is now a sportsmans club. I now have my own cabin in Lewiston, Michigan and will miss the skiing.

    • Rick Flannery says:

      Our family were members of Sheridan Valley during the mid to late ’70s, we were there every weekend in the winter and always during the week of Christmas. We made a lot of friends and we all have awesome memories, the Girt family, the Cassidys, the Reynolds, Tom was the son of the lady that ran the kitchen, can’t remember their last name, Jeff Turpin; what a great way to grow up and get introduced to a great sport.
      Every year they would have the annual races. We all participated and had such a good time, even when the manager caught us skiing down the poma lift lne using the people as gates and he threw us off the hill. (rightfully so!!)

  3. Gay Streeter Landstrom says:

    Our family loved going to Sheridan Valley each Winter. It was there that I learned to ski in the late 60’s. In the 70’s, we often brought groups of friends with us to ski the runs. I received two black eyes when one of the old pomma lifts broke and swung down into my face. We miss our good friends, the Mays, particularly Randy and Kirt.

  4. Robert Moore says:

    I remember the “ski hill” fondly. We went at least 3 or 4 times a season. I remember the round fireplace and drinking hot chocolate. I also remember attending a pig roast there in the summer, my mom Kitty Moore still has many pictures of Sheridan Valley in her cedar chest.

  5. snowfri says:

    My father, Fred Waara, was a proud supporter of Sheridan Valley. It’s where I spent every winter weekend and really honed my skiing skills on Norway, Hank’s Hollow and Mombo. Even broke my skis on the jump we built on Mombo skiing with the Skog, Taylor, Rogers and Reynolds families. My Uncle, Bill Waara, an engineer, designed the fixed place poma lift that was used on the beginner hill. Often my Dad and Uncle Bill would set up their portable rope tow alongside the flat area to the left at the skirt of Mombo for those who needed a little flatter terrain to get started. The winter carnival in March always brought out memorable costumes.Uncle Jerry Skog in a giant sombrero, my Pa in his German army officer outfit as Colonel Klink. I started racing with tag alders as slalom gates on Norway. I’d tie my Dad’s red and blue hankies for flags. It was a marvelous place to bring a family–affordable, good food, friendly and convenient–and instill the love for snow. I’ve grown up to become a lifelong skier. Every important decision I’ve made in life has been on skis, from where I would go to college to whom I would marry. In fact, last month my daughter actually got married on skis with a ceremony at 10,090 feet in Rocky Mountain National Park and my son is a professional slope style snowboarder traveling the world. I believe the most precious places on this planet you must ski to see and that includes both ends of the Earth. I was the first woman from Michigan to ski to the Geographic North Pole and to also ski at the South Pole. I’ve also truly “Crossed a Country” on skis, from Russia to Sweden across Finland. And skied every month of the year, including August in Argentina. Life is good and so are my memories of Sheridan Valley.

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