Bryce’s Hill – St. Ignace

On Thursday, Dec. 11, 1958, The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise mentioned that Bryce’s Hill near St. Ignace was listed among 69 ski areas in the state in the advertising feature ” Fun in the Snow in Michigan, Winter Wonderland.” On Thu., Mar. 16, 1961, the same paper reported that based upon practices held the previous weekend there would be many entrants in the slalom and downhill races for boys and girls to be the first ever held at Bryce’s Hill the following weekend.

On Feb. 3, 1966 and Jan. 4, 1968, The Cass City Chronicle published the AAA Michigan 1966 and 1968 Winter Sports Fun Guide. They each listed Brice’s Hill (sic) 5 mi. west of St. Ignace with one slope and one tow. The 1971 AAA Michigan Winter Sports Guide printed in The Owosso Argus-Press on Oct. 21, 1971 still listed Bryce’s Hill with one slope and one tow, with a warming house and lighting. However, on Apr. 6, 1972, The Republican-News and St. Ignace Enterprise bemoaned the lack of a ski hill for the just past (1971-72) season and reported that the City Manager was negotiating to relocate it to the Steele Farm, north of St. Ignace near Gamble’s Lake.

Apparently, Bryce’s Hill (or Brice’s Hill) failed to operate for the 1971-72 season and ceased operations with the 1970-71 season.

If you have any information about early lift-served skiing near St. Ignace, please post it or send it to us via the directions on the About MILSAP page.

2 Responses to Bryce’s Hill – St. Ignace

  1. Neil Hill says:

    Bryces Hill is the local name for the large hill that US-2 goes down just south of the intersection with Cheeseman road. The Ski hill that you refer to was partially destroyed by the widening project of US-2 in the 1980s. The ski hill was moved just to the East of that location, still using the same driveway. In the google map link: https://www.google.com/maps/@45.8885825,-84.8312272,513m/data=!3m1!1e3
    You can see the scar of the old hill leaving the highway going towards the driveway, as also the new ski hill just to the east of that. The new hill was renamed silver mountain, and now carries the name of Doc Holle’s Silver Mountain. http://www.saintignace.org/visit-st-ignace/winter-fun/

    I also suggest that you research the ski hill with lifts that operated for one season on Mackinac Island.

  2. Barry "Buz" Haltenhoff says:

    I learned to ski and race at Bryce’s Hill in the early 60’s. My dad, Ed Haltenhoff, was instrumental in forming a racing team of local kids and supportive parents, and improving the area. When I began skiing there in the winter of 1961-62, the rope tow was on the right side of the hill (looking uphill). The driveway came in at the top off of US-2 (the road is still there and services a communication tower). With the rope tow on the right side (looking uphill), I became a lot better at turning left than right because you always had to turn left at the bottom to get to the lift. A year later it was moved to the other side. That helped me improve my right turns and gradually my turning ability balanced out. The old rope tow towers and automobile wheel “pulleys” are still there. About 1964-65 a new warming hut was built at the bottom of the hill and the access drive moved to Cheeseman Road, where it now serves as access to Doc Holley’s Silver Mountain. I have a newspaper clipping from the St. Ignace paper dated, Jan. 28, 1965 (a Friday), announcing the the opening of night skiing under lights. The article said that there was a fine turnout that first night even with a stiff wind blowing and a temperature of 12 degrees. Night skiing at Bryce’s hill was Tuesday and Friday nights from 7:00pm – 10:00pm, with Tuesday nights reserved “exclusively for adults”. I remember that night skiing opener well as my sister and I had purposely failed to tell our parents about our elementary band concert at LaSalle H.S. so we could go skiing under the lights instead. I can’t speak for my sister, but I never regretted that decision. All these years later I’m still skiing…sometimes even under the lights.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s